When an AI breakthrough isn’t one: Batching process

This is an interesting bit for neural processing via GPU’s. Instead of training on the entire 100 million outcomes—product purchases, in this example—Mach divides them into three “buckets,” each containing 33.3 million randomly selected outcomes. Now, MACH creates another “world,” and in that world, the 100 million outcomes are again randomly sorted into three buckets. Crucially, […]

AI hype: Hardware revolution pushes AI into the mainstream

This is hopelessly naive but a very interesting article. Is AI really “ready” for the mainstream? The debate is hopelessly outdated, by the time this post is up. We have only a notional idea of how it is going to impact our daily lives based on what futurists peddle. I think, the impact is going […]

Good science, Bad Science: Why don’t we get a “cure” for cancer?

This post was “inspired” by an editorial from Scientific American (and I am riding its coattails) because I needed someone to call out the broken process. The essay does make some generalisations, however. Yet, it is still relevant because we, as scientists (and clinicians) owe it to our patients who look up to us. We […]

#Reference Manager Showdown: a full review of #Papers 3, #Zotero, #F1000, and #Paperpile (+ ReadCube)

I had planned to do some kind of a “review” for reference managers. However, the author has done a better job than I could do. His workflow dictates Paperpile. I like the application, but their web service is entirely dependent on Google. I dislike Google Drive- it syncs horribly, and there’s no comparison for Dropbox. […]

What we can learn from people with beautiful minds | Financial Times

I stumbled on this fascinating read. It got me thinking- as usual. This quote below is important. I am an Oncologist but there’s so much to learn! I have been finally able to get the workflow I craved for but it has been the most intense three weeks! There are more ideas going forward. Stay […]