How AI is shaping up consumer behaviour

Ian Smith writing for Financial Times: AI, which sifts data and aims to learn like humans, is allowing insurers to produce highly individualised profiles of customer risk that evolve in real time. In parts of the market, it is being used to refine or replace the traditional model of an annual premium, creating contracts that … Continue reading How AI is shaping up consumer behaviour

Why you should move out of Facebook?

From the Ad-Guard blog: Keeping an eye on your health data Facebook said that it did not "offer tools to target people based on their emotional state". But any owner of a business account sees the basic targeting options inside: Facebook offers them people who are "away from family", "got married three months ago", "returned … Continue reading Why you should move out of Facebook?

On hiring

Are you lucky to get these kind of emails to apply for a research position you recently advertised? John Carmack on Twitter: People like the idea of hard and fast rules, but putting +/-infinity as a factor in a policy decision is almost never the best plan. Hiring is an obvious example, with "requirements" that … Continue reading On hiring

Social media for oncologists: Is it worth it?

I have been grappling with this idea repeatedly, and it isn't the last word on the subject. I might be revisiting it in the future. Twitter makes for some interesting conversations at times, but one must keep in mind that those are merely snapshots of thoughts. It can never replace the medium of a blog, … Continue reading Social media for oncologists: Is it worth it?

Good science, Bad Science: Why don’t we get a “cure” for cancer?

This post was "inspired" by an editorial from Scientific American (and I am riding its coattails) because I needed someone to call out the broken process. The essay does make some generalisations, however. Yet, it is still relevant because we, as scientists (and clinicians) owe it to our patients who look up to us. We … Continue reading Good science, Bad Science: Why don’t we get a “cure” for cancer?