In defense of privacy

In the series’s continuation on social cooling and advocating for privacy, I have yet another insight into it.

Here’s an interesting discussion that explains the conceptual idea for the laypersons without making it too obvious. While we are all keen to preserve the privacy in our routine lives, we often keep it as an open book in the publ;ic domain. I am not questioning the choices for who do it. However, the repercussions are too difficult to measure as an outcome in the long term. Unless you are aware of how this is going to come to bite you, you won’t do it.

There are several ways to get social validation if that’s the whole point of being on Twitter with a megaphone. However, you are moving in your echo chamber and that makes it impossible for you to grow as an individual because you base your whole interaction on “like-minded” individuals. You believe your own falsehoods or beliefs without being exposed to an alternative point of view.

Therefore, privacy and a relative anonymity is a must on the social media. No one would care if I am missing without the megaphone.

Here’s something from the author:

Privacy is about controlWithout privacy we cannot decide for ourselves how to live our lives. If there is no privacy all become public. Whoever has more power and an interest can affect your life according to their own rules. Then, I have to care about what other people think, otherwise they will control how I can behave. As before the peace of Westphalia, the issue is not that other people are bad, they have to do it. When everything is subject to public scrutiny, you either control the rules and judge others or you are judged and controlled by others.

I think it is time to be aware of it. Because the time to “take it back” is long gone now.