Healthcare Enterprise: Service and Security

This still makes me very nostalgic!

It surprised me when someone in my Telegram group alerted me to the “resurrection” of BlackBerry devices coming in 2021.

A device is the beginning and the end point in enterprise security. There have been several approaches to “secure” company data in container profiles, but the claims are best taken on the face value. Well-funded competitors like Apple started fanning out a public relations exercise in “bring your own device” and that was prevalent in 2014. I don’t hear about it now. Extensive marketing campaigns convinced IT users about the software as a service opportunity without investing in the expensive BlackBerry handsets.

I am not sure if it was a wise move because data breaches have now become a commonplace. Recently, University of Utah has paid up USD 457,000 because ransomware attacked them. There are several geopolitical connotations for the research and intellectual property generated on the campuses without graded access.

I can expand the problem statement to encompass any section of the governance. Building an usable security is essential because eventually end users would find “ways around it” anyway.

That is why it is imperative to have a platform to trust. That’s where BlackBerry comes in. Unarguably, they faltered in the consumer domain, but I find it amusing when Apple speaks about privacy while having the worst record on “zero day exploits” in the dark market. It is desperately trying to shore up revenues through its App stores and leveraging its advertising business gradually.

Therefore, the announcement for a new device from BlackBerry’s license is interesting. They are coming in when data breaches have hit a new normal. Healthcare data is especially valuable, and I can foresee its potential to provide a secure end point.

On the flip side, I don’t know how innovative the device would be. My trusted BlackBerry Passport was replaced only because Android had become the bitter reality. I still yearn to head back to secure confines of what defined the existence for the better part of my online life.