Health systems worldwide receive wake-up call

Financial Times has an ongoing series that states (or overstates) the benefit of AI. All through the blog and in my past and present coverage (and writeups), I have only emphasised on one thing- there has to be an objective measurement and an endpoint. If the technology (or the group of technologies) fail to provide a return on investment, it would be an utter waste of time.

The stakes are high to break into the hospitals because these are usually long term commitments. Do you really expect a hospital (or an enterprise) to switch gears to another vendor mid-way if the existing software solution isn’t working as intended? No. But there will be promises galore to “fix” the problem in the “updates”.

It doesn’t work like that.

Several Chinese companies have made significant progress in training AI systems to speed up diagnosis of coronavirus infections. The research arm of ecommerce group Alibaba has a system that can process chest scans in 30 seconds, compared with 10 minutes or more for a human, and claims to have used it to diagnose more than 30,000 cases. Florida hospitals are trying a visitor screening system that analyses facial attributes such as sweating and discolouration as well as data from a thermal scan. China’s SenseTime combines thermal scanners with facial recognition technology that can pick out people who fail to wear masks in public places

What the author in the FT write up has written is a broad overview of sensors and “AI” mashed up together like a PR piece. This is a tried and tested tactic to “make up a story” because boots on the ground would need resources (and a brain) to actually report one.

via Health systems worldwide receive wake-up call | Financial Times