Social Media: Accelerates information overload and disinformation

I have been writing extensively around the scourge of social media, but there are very few write-ups that determine the veracity of the algorithms, which undermine the experience of the web-sites. Therefore this brilliant write-up from Scientific American deserves recommendation. Modern technologies are amplifying these biases in harmful ways, however. Search engines direct Andy to … Continue reading Social Media: Accelerates information overload and disinformation

A series of articles on AI Ethics.

Starting today, I'd be covering three major articles on the ethics of artificial intelligence. I link them from HBR and raise very important issues. As usual, I'd highlight the key principles in discussion and weave in my ideas around them. Some of them are pay walled, and while the bias in inherent (because the industry … Continue reading A series of articles on AI Ethics.

Artificial intelligence and its limits – An understanding of AI’s limitations is starting to sink in

Are we reaching the "AI Winter" or end of the "hype cycle"? As the write up argues (well), that much of the debate around the AI/machine learning and pattern recognition was driven by the investor "hype cycle" and their echo chambers. We are not heading towards AI Winter but bracing for the inevitable slow down … Continue reading Artificial intelligence and its limits – An understanding of AI’s limitations is starting to sink in

Telemedicine: Future depends on how telecommuting is accepted

This has a fascinating insight into telecommuting. There are several "outliers" that don't herald a trend but merit consideration. I feel that in the long term, hospitals would feel compelled to offer "teleconsultations" (especially if they check the thorny issues of payments and insurance payouts). It could be possible for, say, pathologists to interpret the … Continue reading Telemedicine: Future depends on how telecommuting is accepted

Not even wrong: ways to predict tech

The author has a provocative essay on the "science" of "prediction". He makes very sweeping generalisations about mobile phones, for example. The mobile phone was a standard entity and I have long held belief that it was BlackBerry that invented the form factor (and the complete underlying technology). Apple "reinvented" it with worse monopolistic controls. … Continue reading Not even wrong: ways to predict tech