C0DE517E: Is true hacking dead? What we lost.

The word hacking got associated with the cybercrime, instead of “tinkering”. It still represents a challenge.

Hack your productivity, for example, still holds appeal to me because there is so much we can do to improve the gains of efficiency.

And ironically, probably by utter coincidence, but ironically indeed, all the new power brokers of this era, the Facebooks and Amazons, the Googles and Twitters and so on, fully embrace opensource stacks, hundreds of millions lines of codes powering the AIs, the networks of today.
The new IBMs do know very well that lines of code are for the most part worthless, but people and communities aren’t, so it’s a no brainer to opensource more if in change one gets more people involved in a project, and more engineers hired…

In the end, probably licenses don’t mean much. And perhaps technology doesn’t either. How we design our human-computer (and human-to-human) interfaces does. And if we don’t start thinking about people and think that some lines of code or a contract can change the world, we’ll be stuck in not understanding why we keep failing.

The best minds of this generation, are sadly in the business of either bartering away our generation economies or trying to find ways that we click on more advertisements. Hype cycle perpetuates more hype without real tangible gains.

Brilliant write up!

via C0DE517E: Is true hacking dead? What we lost.