App Store Politics

I usually refrain from mentioning about the app store politics, as it doesn’t concern most users. App stores are “curated experiences” which are “frictionless” for end users. If this sounds like what Wired would write, well it is! The cheerleaders are nowhere to be seen now.

As a former BlackBerry Elite, it was very difficult to see a zero acceptance in the consumer space. Primarily, I bet on a technology was ahead of its time and offered a superior alternative to existing platforms.

Consider this first:

[embeddoc url=”https://radoncnotes.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/015127.pdf” viewer=”google”]

The author followed it up here:

The other thing that was hard to understand, is we used to have a great relationship with Apple. We were not flying under the radar. Since the App Store first launched in 2008, we used to be invited to all Apple events to see the new product launches, we met with the iTunes team to discuss upcoming initiates for the App Store, our apps were featured on the devices inside of many demo units into Apple Stores. It felt like a complete 180, and until this day I never got a formal conversation on what they actually objected to, beyond being pointed to a vague rule which was applied arbitrarily. They became a brick wall in terms of communication, and this is why I resorted to emailing Tim Cook. I assumed nothing would come of it, but it was the last thing I could think of.I never received a response, and never knew if he even got it, so I was shocked to see it again today from his inbox.

App store policies are a black-box. As Apple forays deeper into healthcare, it is essential to understand its monopolistic practises. Is it good for the consumers? I am not sure if the end users are content with paying up money for “subscription” and a shylockian 30% commission. Developers have engineered this duopoly and consistently ignored the opportunities that came by- BlackBerry OS, Firefox OS (oh well, there was Windows Mobile too).