AMP: Mobile cancer and how to fight back against Google AMP as a web user and a web developer

On mobile, I use NextDNS solution with Mullvad VPN. Next DNS has numerous lists that helps to block the advertisements (and trackers). However, AdGuard is still a superior solution.

There’s no satisfactory solution on iOS because it cripples the mobile user experience (everything by default is Safri browser). It is to push the App Store (and the applications) as a profitable business. However, by using the DNS based adblocking, it is a perfect solution to “surf”. I use my iPad for accessing textbooks, though.

Rooted Android is the best solution- using AdGuard in the HTTP mode and leaving the VPN for spoofing the IP lists.

Next DNS has a filter list to cut out the AMP crap anyway.

The main reason AMP exists is that the sites are slow to load.
But why are the sites slow to load in the first place? They feature many unnecessary third-party elements that do nothing for the user experience other than slow it all down.

Google themselves will point the finger at their own analytics and ads if you use their webpage speed tests to measure the performance of your site. They even provide guides on how to make third-party resources less slow.

Analytics scripts, advertising scripts, social media scripts and so much more junk.It is normal to visit a site and the majority of it is composed of unnecessary elements that you don’t see. This is why the web is so much faster with Firefox’s Enhanced Tracking Protection or with an adblocker.

Firefox blocks almost 30 different trackers on a single page of Wired. It also blocks the auto-play of video and audio. This is about 30% of the total page weight. It’s important to note that Wired still gets to display their banners for people to subscribe to the magazine.

via How to fight back against Google AMP as a web user and a web developer – Marko Saric