AI and Medicine: Making philosophical arguments

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I got this document from a source; I apologise that I cannot allow this to be downloaded; you can read it up here anyway. I am surprised why BMJ kept it behind the paywall since the main article was open access.

However, the philosophical stance for arguing against the AI is that patients need a “human touch”. Yes, they do. No one is close to suggesting that AI would replace the human physicians. The dystopian future is that patients would speak to their voice assistants who then would prescribe medicines. This might be true only if the tech giants are able to influence policy and legislation on the likes of bureaucratic organisations like FDA. I am not suggesting that they will but this is the only way forward. As such, I am seeing fledgling steps by Apple in this way forward. Healthcare information and healthcare in general are extremely lucrative in the US because of perverted system of incentives and a rigid framework. As such, these companies will make a stab there and sway policy in their favor.

You can sue your doctor, but you can’t hope for a claim against Apple or Amazon. For all their outwardly gestures of being consumer friendly, it is extremely profitable to provide a shody customer experience. Apple is a terrible shitty tech company and I have repeatedly stressed here.

The disruption from AI would be in the routine repetitive work- coding, for example. Insurance claims and automating the clearinghouse, for example, is the next step. However, it would require cleansing the sum of many parts and can move forward after “negotiations” with the “stakeholders”. Everyone wants to be the technology layer because spin offs as the sole monopoly power are immense. How many times have you shifted your email service provider, for example?

Philosophical constructs are a fancy way of looking at AI and perhaps remains in the denial mode. These departments are redundant and represent a vestige of classical Victorian era. They only serve to muddle our grasp on reality.

Choose wisely and prepare for future that’s as uncertain as the pandemic.