More on Apple’s Transgressions

Edward Snowden writes:

The task Apple intends its new surveillance system to perform—preventing their cloud systems from being used to store digital contraband, in this case unlawful images uploaded by their customers—is traditionally performed by searching their systems. While it’s still problematic for anybody to search through a billion people’s private files, the fact that they can only see the files you gave them is a crucial limitation.

Now, however, that’s all set to change.

Under the new design, your phone will now perform these searches on Apple’s behalf before your photos have even reached their iCloud servers, and—yada, yada, yada—if enough “forbidden content” is discovered, law-enforcement will be notified.

Please note the crucial changes:

Under the new design, your phone will now perform these searches on Apple’s behalf before your photos have even reached their iCloud servers, and—yada, yada, yada—if enough “forbidden content” is discovered, law-enforcement will be notified.

Do you understand this crucial difference now?

Here’s more:

 ​​​​​​As soon as the public first came to learn of the “spyPhone” plan, experts began investigating its technical weaknesses, and the many ways it could be abused, primarily within the parameters of Apple’s design. Although these valiant vulnerability-research efforts have produced compelling evidence that the system is seriously flawed, they also seriously miss the point: Apple gets to decide whether or not their phones will monitor their owners’ infractions for the government, but it’s the government that gets to decide on what constitutes an infraction… and how to handle it.

(emphasis mine)

There is no escape unless people disavow and shift to open source replacements like PinePhone; especially with the physical kill switches.

I stand for privacy, but the regulation must evolve or appear to show it is not titling towards obtrusiveness or surveillance. Yes, the government surveillance is troublesome, but private corporations enabling this – more so. The narrative in mainstream media never blames technology companies, but instead blames the governments. My concern is more rooted in healthcare privacy.

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